Framework2019-10-04T07:35:12+08:00

(只提供英文版本)

General Education Theme/Area:
I. Language and Communication

1. English Language*

EELC121 & EELC122
English II: Introduction to University English 1 & 2
3+3 credits
2019-10-04T03:48:05+08:00

Year Level: 1

EELC121/122 are two semester courses. Upper-intermediate-level students meet three hours a week to expand and improve upon English language skills developed in EELC101/102. An effort will be made to conduct needs analyses and work with learners to identify individual language learning needs and the types of language tasks expected in their academic work. When possible, theme-based approaches will be used to link English language improvement to other coursework. Language teaching and learning will focus on cognitive-academic language proficiency as well as the improvement of basic interpersonal and presentation skills in English.

EELC131 & EELC132
English III: Academic English 1 & 2
3+3 credits
2019-10-04T03:50:50+08:00

Year Level: 1

EELC131/132 are two semester courses. These courses build upon interaction and study skills/strategies taught at previous levels while focusing on improved use of English for academic purposes. An effort will be made to conduct needs analyses and work with learners to identify individual language learning needs and the types of language tasks expected in their academic work. When possible, content- or theme-based approaches will be used to link English language improvement to other coursework. Language teaching and learning will focus on cognitive-academic language proficiency while continuing to improve informal and formal use of English by students.

EELC141 & EELC142
English IV: Academic English 3 & 4
3+3 credits
2019-10-04T03:52:34+08:00

Year Level: 1

EELC141/142 are two semester courses. These courses build upon communication and study skills/strategies taught at previous levels and focus on academic language proficiency, while continuing to improve informal and formal use of English by students. Instructors work with learners to identify individual language learning needs related to their academic work, and often use content- or theme-based approaches to link English to other coursework. Skills addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, using outlines to develop and write essays, drawing conclusions from texts, inferring meaning and authors’ opinions from texts, and giving effective presentations on a variety of topics in class. Students also will work with features of English such as idiom, inference, and appropriateness.

ENGL112
Critical Reading and Writing
3 credits
2019-10-04T03:54:03+08:00

Year Level: 1

ENGL112 seeks to develop the writing and reading skills that are necessary for active participation within the University academic environment. The course will focus primarily on the development of skills related to analysing different rhetorical situations, responding to those situations and developing effective writing processes that encourage active revision and editing. Students are expected to read a number of academic and non-academic non-fiction texts within 3-4 thematic areas (taught as modules) and write 3-4 essays (one for each module) of appropriate academic prose. At least one essay assignment must be an ‘in-class’ timed essay. Throughout the semester students will be expected to produce 6-8 pages (1500-2000 words) of edited prose writing, which will form the bulk of the evaluated student products.

ENGL113
Experiencing Literature in English
3 credits
2019-10-04T03:55:18+08:00

Year Level: 1

ENGL113 will build upon the proficiency developed by students in the first semester of the General Education English Language Requirement by developing reading and writing skills through the study of literary texts that are related to a particular unifying theme. Literary texts, however, must be chosen to include at least two of the following genres: poetry, fiction and drama. When a teacher proposes a set of readings, the Head of the English Department must approve course outline. The primary mode of evaluation for the course is argumentative and expository writing about themes represented within the literary works. In all, student should produce no less than 1500 words of edited prose within either two or three essays.

2. Chinese/Foreign Language*

CHIN112
Chinese Language and Chinese Literature
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:30:45+08:00

Year Level: 1

This course covers topics such as characteristics of Chinese language, its significance as one of the global languages, its relationship with Chinese cultures and communities, and its expression in Chinese literature. The focus of the last topic may change in accordance with the expertise of individual instructors, possible areas including traditional Chinese poetry, traditional Chinese fiction and drama, modern Chinese literature, contemporary Chinese literature, and Chinese literature in the world. This is a discussion-oriented, student-centered course in which all students are expected to engage in class discussions and critical analysis of the reading materials. The language used in the classroom is Putonghua.

CHLL1011
Chinese for Professional Communication
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:32:02+08:00

Year Level: 1

本課程的目標是訓練同學有效地應用中文到日常生活和工作中去,培養和提高同學的中文應用能力和水平,無論將來從事什麼行業,都可運用中文為其溝通和發揮能力的工具。課程將採用講課、討論和練習的方式授課。講授的內容包括公函、通告與啟事、計劃書和私人書信等。

CHLL1012
Chinese for Non-Native Speakers I
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:31:57+08:00

Year Level: 1

In this course we learn Mandarin Chinese at a beginning level. It aims at students who have had no prior knowledge of the Chinese language. In the class, students work on massive oral exercises in order to build up and improve their Chinese pronunciation skills. The course helps students better understand Chinese by introducing them to fundamentals of Chinese syntax and morphology. The course also introduces various aspects of Chinese culture in order to reduce the cultural obstacles to Chinese language learning.

GELH1001
Chinese Languages and Chinese Communities
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:20:01+08:00
Year Level: 1
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 2 – Chinese/Foreign Language

In this course the students expand their knowledge of Chinese languages and Chinese communities and understand language phenomena as an expression of culture and as a function of society. Through readings, discussions and mini-projects the students apply the sociolinguistics knowledge introduced to answer academic and practical questions. Global and local language situations are surveyed in a Chinese perspective and current issues in language matters are analyzed. Through problem-solving exercises, the students hone their skills of critical thinking, communication and collaboration.

PORT1000
Portuguese Language I – Introductory Portuguese
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:33:46+08:00

Year Level: 1

Principles of written and oral language. The comprehension and conversation through exercises in the class and language laboratory. The grammar fundamentals obtained through the use of simple pronunciation and reading materials.

3. Communication

COMM316
Communicating in a Global Society
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:35:07+08:00

Year Level: 3 to 4

This course will equip students to become effective communicators in a globally interconnected knowledge society by developing their ability to both communicate their own ideas and to analyze and evaluate the communication of others. Through individual and collaborative exercises and assignments students will learn how to analyze audiences, choose proper communication channels, and design and deliver effective oral and written messages. The aim of the course is to make each student a more competent and confident communicator.

GEGC311
Special Topics in Communication
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:37:03+08:00

Year Level: 3 to 4

The content of the course will vary dependent upon the special topics offering. The course will address the intended Area 3 learning outcomes and equip students to become effective communicators in a knowledge-based society by developing their ability to communicate their own ideas and evaluate the communication of ideas by others. Through individual and collaborative learning exercises and assignments students will develop the ability to analyze audiences, design, deliver, and evaluate oral, written and digital communications. The course fulfills the General Education Area 3 requirement.

GELH2000
Creativity and Writing: English for a Global Readership
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:24:46+08:00
Year Level: 2
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 3 – Communication

In this course students learn to express themselves creatively through the medium of English. While the main emphasis is on story making, students experience a range of creative texts (including stories, poems, songs and films), as models for their own imaginative work.
Students will learn to write simple texts in key creative genres: for instance different types of poem, short story and life writing (biography and autobiography).
Learning to tell and write stories, individually and in groups, students gain confidence in expressing themselves and in constructing a narrative from different points of view. Working from lecture to discussion mode, class time is largely devoted to understanding how simple stories work and to practising basic techniques of storytelling. Group work, in-class performance and writing for a global audience are integral to the course. Reading and homework assignments set from week to week challenge the student to create engaging creative texts from memory and imagination. Assessment is by individual portfolio including an agreed combination of individual and group work in different genres.

General Education Theme/Area:
II. Science and Information Techology

4. Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

MATH1005
Mathematics and Statistics for Everyday Life
3 credits
2019-10-04T05:05:32+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

The goal of this course is to increase students’ mathematical literacy and statistics literacy. The primary goal is to help you develop the quantitative reasoning skills that you will need to succeed in other college courses, in your career, and in your life as a citizen in an increasingly complex world. Focus on common-sense applications and daily occurrences of mathematics and statistics.

MATH1006
Applications of Mathematics in Today’s World
3 credits
2019-10-04T05:05:37+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

1. Introduction to Selected Applications/Interesting Topics of Mathematics (For examples, ‘Matrix Algebra with applications’, ‘Managing Money with consideration of its time value’, ‘Mathematical Modeling’, ‘Numbers in Real World’, some topics in History of Mathematics).
2. Introduction to Calculus.

GEGC111
Special Topics in Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:37:06+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

The content of the course will vary dependent upon the special topics offering. The course will address the intended Area 4 learning outcomes by focusing on the prevalence, relevance and practicalities of mathematics and its applications in today’s world. The course will use real-world examples to engage students in mathematical thinking, problem solving and applications of math in everyday life. Mathematical concepts, techniques and thinking are taught by hands-on minds-on applications. The course fulfills the General Education Area 4 requirement.

5. Information Technology and Knowledge Society

CISC1007
Computing in Modern Society
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:39:51+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

Computing in Modern Society explores the impact of computer in modern society. Designed to attract a diverse undergraduate audience with different exposure to technology, the course provides an introduction to the basic knowledge and skills for an efficient, responsible and creative use of computer. General overview includes the fundamental concepts and principles of hardware architecture, organization and components; software uses, applications and development; data processing and information systems; and basic features of networking, together with the societal, legal and ethical issues and implications of computing in our daily lives.

CISC1008
Information Security and Privacy
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:39:54+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

This course exposes the student to a broad range of computer systems and information security topics. It is designed to provide a general knowledge of information security and privacy, including basic concepts, terminologies, and social issues. This course outlines the methods of protecting data security by following the procedure of capturing, processing and utilizing data. It combines core information technology concepts such as Internet, communication, database, etc, with the social and ethical concerns regarding security and privacy. This course introduces each important area from both the user and the IT professional’s perspective, lays out the security vulnerabilities and possible threats, and follows technical and legal countermeasures to address them.

CISG114
Web Technology and Life
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:41:50+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

Web Technology and Life is a one-semester course for students to explore the impact, in our daily lives, of modern Web tools including selected topics such as Blogs, Podcasts, Wikis, RSS, Social Bookmarks/Networking, Virtual Worlds, e-Business Models, and e-Government initiatives. The course is designed to help the casual computer users understand the latest in free and inexpensive Web tools and their power for research, collaboration, and communication. It provides the history, background, and perspectives of Web 2.0 technologies to demystify the jargons connected with the latest Web phenomena.

ISOM1001
Contemporary Information Systems for Organizations
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:40:57+08:00

Year Level: 1 to 2

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the evolving field of information systems (IS) from an organizational perspective. A wide range of topics are covered beginning with the fundamentals of systems, information, organizations, the underlying information Technology (IT) as well as the ethical issues for IS/IT in today’s enterprises. A contemporary perspective on IT is provided by emphasizing current topics (e.g. IT138 infrastructure and the Internet technology) before presenting the E-commerce and E-business developments which are radically transforming the traditional organizations and our lives. Throughout the course, we explore implications of this new IS/IT – digital firm – scenario for corporate management in today’s global business environments.

6. Physical Science and the World

GEST1008
Exploring the Earth
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:46:08+08:00
Year Level: 1
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 6 – Physical Science and the World

An introduction to major principles of physical geology covering the structure of the Earth, plate tectonics, volcanism and mountain building processes, weathering, sedimentation and rock formation, metamorphism and rock cycle, mass movement, earthquake, surface and underground water process, water and climate change.

GEST1010
Chemistry and Modern Society
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:47:01+08:00
Year Level: 1
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 6 – Physical Science and the World

This course is designed for students that are non-chemistry majors and will be taught with a physical science basis. This course relates application of chemistry to the benefits of modern society. It provides an introduction to the study of the properties and changes in matter. Course emphasizes topics such as: sustainable future, global climates, energy usage followed by their applications in synthetic plastics, medical drugs, food nutrition, genetic engineering, and modern materials.

GEST1012
Electricity and Life
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:48:15+08:00
Year Level: 1
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 6 – Physical Science and the World

This course is about the study of physical science for non-engineering students with emphasis on basic electricity related topics. The focus of the course is not only the elementary physics of electricity; but also enlightening applications in Energy, Telecommunication, Health and Safety of electricity for the human life. Some demonstrations and hand-on experiments are also arranged to provide hand-on experiences and insights for the students on the relative topics.

GEST1015
Physics and Modern Society
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:49:46+08:00
Year Level: 1
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 6 – Physical Science and the World

To enable students to know the use of physics in modern society and technology. Fundamental laws of nature are emphasized with examples of various applications in daily life. Moreover, selected topics of physics relevant to modern society are included. Topics are presented at an introductory level for the students with little or no background in physical science.

7. Life Science, Health and the Human Condition

EDUC2062
Wonders in Life Science and Health: Personal Health & Sustainability
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:54:47+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

The purpose of this course is to understand the principles and concepts of health and hygiene, to examine the human behavior factors that affect their engagement in daily life and to learn the sustainable methods and practice on health. Topics such as stress and health, physical activity and health, nutrition and health, weight management, mental health, drugs abuse, knowledge about HIV & AIDS, and emergency & first aid will be examined.

FHSG212
Wonders in Life Science and Health: Biomedical Science
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:56:42+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

This course introduces the fundamental concepts in life science, biomedical science, pharmaceutics, Chinese medicine and health management to students. It allows students to have a general understanding of the basic theories, working principles, methods for health preservation and disease healing in Western and Chinese medicine. This general education module will also feature visits to the ICMS’s research laboratories and/or pharmaceutical industries in Macao.

FSTG213
Wonders in Life Science and Health: Environmental Biology
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:56:46+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

Throughout this course, students can better understand the unity and diversity of life interacting with the surrounding environments. Such major topics as population ecology, community interactions, ecosystems/biogeochemical cycles, biosphere and human impact on biosphere, and animal and social behavior will be covered. Students will also learn the unifying concepts in biology, the cellular basis and the ongoing flow of life, plant and animal systems and their control, and ecology and behavior; and so that students will be able to exploit biological processes and appreciate the importance of the quality of environment.

PSYC2008
Wonders in Life Science and Health: Health Psychology
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:58:03+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to how psychology can help people live longer and stay healthier. It will examine the role of psychological factors in physical well-being and illness. Specifically, focus is put on how psychological aspects and factors contribute to the prevention and treatment of illness, recovery from illness, and the promotion and maintenance of good health. Topics covered include field research methods, health enhancing and compromising behaviors, stress and coping, social support, pain and its management, and the role of psychological and social factors in the etiology and course of chronic and terminal illness in contemporary society. Overall, positive health psychology will be the main focus of the course.

General Education Theme/Area:
III. Society and Culture

8. World Histories and Cultures

GEGC211
Special Topics in World Histories and Cultures
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:37:54+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

The content of the course will vary dependent upon the special topics offering. The course will address the intended Area 8 learning outcomes by using historical knowledge and perspectives to enable students to appreciate and understand the importance of history and culture, how historical knowledge is constructed and used, and the ways that history has been brought into and understood in the present. Students will learn core concepts of history and culture, and how these concepts have shaped, history, knowledge and society. The course fulfills the General Education Area 8 requirement.

HIST2000
Global Issues in History and Culture
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:58:10+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

This course will provide an historical perspective for selected contemporary global issues. Through the study of specific case studies students will develop a clearer understanding and appreciation of historical processes. The aim of this course is to understand the variety of ways that the past has been brought into and understood in the present, rather than a comprehensive survey of a limited time and place. Students will also learn about the core concepts of history, culture, and globalization, which will be discussed in the context of the contemporary global issues that are the focus of each class. Each semester instructors will select pertinent ‘global issues’ for inclusion in this course (one topic per section).

9. Macao, China and other Societies

GEGC212
Special Topics in Macao, China and other Societies
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:37:58+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

The content of the course will vary dependent upon the special topics offering. The course will address the intended Area 9 learning outcomes by focusing on the political, economic and social aspects of Macao, China and other societies. The course will use a multi-disciplinary approach to focus on important social issues and problems facing today’s multi-cultural societies in greater China and beyond. The course will examine how factors such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, and cultural/historical experiences influence the ways people perceive, understand, relate to and are affected by the physical and social environments in which they live. The course fulfills the General Education Area 9 requirement.

GESB2006
Understanding Population
3 credits
2019-10-04T05:12:47+08:00
Year Level: 2
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 9 – Macao, China and other Societies

This course provides an overview of how social factors can influence population characteristics and how the characteristics of population in turn affect society. We will focus on three primary demographic processes: mortality, fertility and migration. We will learn basic concepts, theories and measurements of each process from both historical and comparative approach. We will apply these basic demographic concepts to contemporary population issues such as concerns over the persistent low, below-replacement fertility level and the aging of the population in Macao, the consequences of the internal migration on urbanization in China or other developing countries. Population literacy is therefore an important part of an individual’s knowledge to understand current social, economic and political debates. In addition, population literacy is essential for yourself as you think about planning your own life in terms of human capital investments, marriage, fertility, labor force participation, saving, migration and many related aspects. In understanding these issues, we will use the social science theories and concepts such as social stratification, social interaction, and continuity and change. We will bridge sociology, anthropology, history, political science, economics, and psychology, and will do a comparative analysis between Macao, China, and other societies.

SOCY213
Environment and Humanity
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:59:46+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

This course examines the complex and often problematic relationships and connections between humans and natural ad built environments. How do environments shape cultures and societies? How do societies and cultures shape environments? What effects does this interaction have on both the natural world and on human life? What are some of the cultural, social, and ecological consequences of development, globalization, economic growth and affluence? How are communities around the world working to manage, protect and improve their natural and built environments? Starting with Macao and China, we will address these questions by examining how cultures and societies construct knowledge about nature and attribute value to it, how they use or abuse environments and resources, and how human activity, culture and social organization have always been deeply linked to the natural, material world. We will also examine how factors such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, and cultural/historical experience influence the ways people perceive, understand, relate to, and are affected by the environments in which they live. In understanding these issues, we will use social science theories and concepts such as social stratification, social interaction, and continuity and change. We will bridge sociology, anthropology, history, political science, economics, and psychology, and will do a comparative analysis between Macao, China, and other societies.

SOCY214
Macao in the Global Context
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:59:49+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

This course intends to familiarize students with the political, economic and social aspects of Macao society as they are related to Chinese, Portuguese and other societies. We will also discuss social issues and problems facing Macao today as a multicultural society. We will examine issues like the political and economic transformations of Macao over the past 450 years, the clash and cooperation of civilizations, religious life of both Chinese and Portuguese peoples, literature and the arts in and about Macao, and social issues and problems. By the end of the class, students should have a clear idea and a critical understanding of Macao’s past, present, and future in relation to the social development in mainland China, and other societies. In understanding these issues, we will use the social science theories and concepts such as social stratification, social interaction, and continuity and change. We will bridge sociology, anthropology, history, political science, economics, and psychology, and will do a comparative analysis between Macao, China, and other societies.

10. Values, Ethics and Meaning of Life

GELH2002
The Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:25:53+08:00
Year Level: 2
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 10 – Values, Ethics and Meaning of Life

This course introduces students to the Holocaust, the systematic murder of the Jews of Europe by the Nazi regime between the years 1939 and 1945. In seeking to understand how the Holocaust happened, students will be introduced first to concepts like racial prejudice and other forms of discrimination, anti-Semitism, and the role of nationalism in creating concepts of the Other. The course will study the rise of the Nazi Party in Weimar Germany, its accession to power in 1933 and the systematic denigration of, and discrimination against, Jews from the years 1933 to 1939. The course will discuss the power of propaganda, the effects of discriminatory laws excluding Jews from all areas of public life and how these lead first to the mass murder of Jews in eastern Europe (Operation Barbarossa) and then the Final Solution, with the establishment of death camps, of which Auschwitz-Birkenau is but the most infamous. This course will also address the issue of genocide, how the Holocaust lead to the concept of genocide, first described as such by Raphael Lemkin in 1943 and subsequent international treaties seeking to prevent further genocides. The course will look at other genocides, including Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda, and Darfur. Special attention will also be paid to the Japanese invasion of China, the Nanjing Massacre and Unit 731 in Manchuria.

GELH2008
Asian Values and Moral Traditions
3 credits
2019-10-04T04:28:11+08:00
Year Level: 2
Equivalent GE Area(s) in 2011/2012 Model:
Area 10 – Values, Ethics and Meaning of Life

This course introduces students to major moral traditions (for example: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, or Bushido) in Asia. Close attention is given to basic values and ethical categories (for example: karma, samsara, moksha, dharma, ren, li, or dao) that have informed Asian moral discourse with special reference to the pivotal role of these values and categories in shaping social, economic, and political life in Asian societies.

PHIL2000
Cultural Values and Global Justice
3 credits
2019-10-04T05:01:37+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

Does the claim to global justice offer a groundwork for transnational values or is it itself an integral part of ‘global capitalism’ or ‘Western hegemony’? Is our moral vision a mere reflection of our cultural preferences and biases? If not, what may serve as the grounds on which the moral judgments of distinct civilizations can be rationally assessed, criticized or justified? In this course we will seek to address these timely questions by focusing on contemporary debates over globalization, global justice, and the ‘clash of civilizations.’

PHIL2001
Capitalism and Morality
3 credits
2019-10-04T05:01:41+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

This course investigates the relationship between capitalism and morality. After tracing the religious roots of capitalism, central features such as the free exchange of products, private property, ideology, and alienation will be systematically elaborated. Different forms such as corporate, free markets, and casino capitalism will be distinguished and related to questions of legitimation, justice and the good life. During the second half of the course we will analyze the impact of global capitalism on culture and politics. Finally, we will pursue the question whether it is still possible to conceive of reasonable alternatives to capitalist modes of production.

General Education Theme/Area:
IV. Self-Development

11. Physical Education (Pass or Fail)

EDUC1036
Wellness and Sport Practice
1 credit
2019-10-04T05:03:28+08:00

Year Level: Any Year

Physical Education (PE), which is composed of theory and sport practice with individual and team sports, provided a general overview divided into two parts. Part I covers sport relevant theories including the function of sports in life, sports injury prevention & treatment, and physical fitness & exercise prescription while Part II is skill-based practice in both team and individual sports. After completing the PE study, students will not only meet individual need and develop the concept of total well-being, but also can apply and transfer what they have learned to their lifestyle and lifelong activities. Students are expected to achieve general standards in their chosen sports.

12. Visual and Performing Arts (Pass or Fail)

EDUC2055
Visual and Performing Arts – Visual Art
2 credits
2019-10-04T04:54:51+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

Artworks of different genres have been delighting people from all ages and all places. We enjoy their beauty and their articulation, but we know nothing or very little about their creation process. The practice of aesthetic appreciation of art not only enables us to enjoy art through deeper understanding of the works, but also enables us to recognize and realize our creative potential and capability, as well as cultivates and broadens our vision of artistic culture. The course will be taught in two parts: Firstly, Introduction to visual and performing arts, which includes common lectures on What is Art? Art and Culture, Understanding Art Genres, Approaches to Art Appreciation. Secondly, Introduction to Visual Arts Appreciation, which includes lectures designed to equip the students with basic knowledge of the different visual art forms and teach them how to appreciate and interpret such artworks by illustrating the relationship between form/style to theme/culture. Masterpieces from different regions/places reveal not merely local colors, but also profound cultural contents, echoing profound problems of life for seeing and understanding the world.

EDUC2056
Visual and Performing Arts – Drama
2 credits
2019-10-04T04:55:25+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

This course is composed of two major components, art introduction and drama performance. This course acquaints students with vocabulary and concepts for critiquing and analyzing visual and performing arts; it examines the function of arts from social and global perspectives; and it encourages students to develop judgment in visual and performing arts’ analysis and criticism. Students will gain an overview of the historical movements and ideas in different forms of arts across eras and cultures. In the drama performance component which follows, students will be introduced to the form and function of dramatic literature in its relationship to theatrical performance. Study of plays as texts leads into the rehearsal and performance of short plays.

EDUC2057
Visual and Performing Arts – Music
2 credits
2019-10-04T04:55:28+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

The music course aims to provide fundamental knowledge of music to all UM students so as to encourage them to experience and enjoy music in their lives. This introductory course of music covers scopes of both Western and Oriental music which include their historical development/styles, musicians and their composition/performance. Traditional academics focus mainly on Western music. However, in this era, world music is gaining more attention than before as the concept of globalization is getting its role. Therefore, this course covers one-third of contents in Oriental music. The general education of music helps students to appreciate and enjoy music listening with comprehension. As the result, students’ attitude and experience toward arts enhanced and elevated.

GEGC213
Special Topics in Visual and Performing Arts
2 credits
2019-10-04T04:38:00+08:00

Year Level: Year 2 to 4

The content of the course will vary dependent upon the special topics offering. The course will address the intended Area 12 learning outcomes by looking at the language, theories, aesthetics and applications of the visual and performing arts through historical and/or modern contexts. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of how the arts, e.g. paintings, sculpture, dance, drama, music, etc. and their combinations are interwoven throughout human existence and how they impact the individual and society. Students will analyze artistic form and function and grapple with the questions “What is art?” and “What makes something artistic?” The course fulfills the General Education Area 12 requirement.

13. University Life (Pass or Fail)

CPED1999
First-Year Experiential Learning
0 credit
2019-10-04T05:03:39+08:00

Year Level: Year 1

This course will use information obtained in the first offerings of SAGE100 to refine and improve the course. This two-semester course is designed to orient first-year students to collegial life, living and learning opportunities, and RC learning goals at the University of Macau. It provides active learning opportunities which enable students to take responsibility for their transition to university and RC life. The course also serves the function of forming student learning communities, which, facilitated by RC faculty, encourage students to explore a wide range of experiential learning activities in RC competency areas (Global Citizenship, Cultural Engagement, Healthy Living, Interpersonal Relations and Teamwork, Leadership and Service) while documenting and assessing their personal growth in an e-portfolio. Students are responsible for submitting e-portfolio project(s). The course runs parallel to and complements the University’s RC requirements for first–year students. Students enrolled in the course develop skills while gaining knowledge and experiences which equip them for the successful completion of the RC requirements and achievement of RC learning goals for first-year students. (SAO topics from the former SASG100 “University Life” will be made available to students in a variety formats as a supplement to this RC course.)

The course includes the following components:

i. 6 eighty-minute classes devoted to RC Competency development, experiential learning activities, and e-portfolio skills, held in the RC throughout the academic year.
ii. RCs manage their own in-house process for re-assigning students to alternative sections, as needed.
iii. Individual RCs may require enhancements to the six class meetings, including skills workshops during first-year orientation, online components, ad hoc curricular-based competency workshops, group project meetings, assessment activities, and the like. Course enhancements will be entirely facilitated and scheduled by each RC.
iv. E-portfolio project(s) will be assigned by each RC with the details of the project(s) at the discretion of the RC. At the minimum, the eportfolio project(s) should require first-year students to engage each RC competency in a substantive manner.
v. Each RC will arrange self and peer assessment activities for first-year students enrolled in the course.

* Students will be assigned to different levels of courses depending on their prior achievements or assessment results in the respective area before enrollment.

In addition, some approved courses are allowed to fulfil part of the university-wide general education requirements by equivalent foundation or preparative courses. Each student is required to take at least 20 out of the 36 prescribed specific general education credit requirements. With prior approval, the remaining 16 general education credit can be substituted by their Year 1 and Year 2 equivalent major prerequisite/foundation/preparative courses.

The following pedagogical and assessment issues should be taken into account when designing and delivering GE courses:

  1. GE courses should be seen as inter-related and integrated. They are not simply introductory courses to a discipline. They should contribute to many of the intended learning outcomes.
  2. Their design should be cross-disciplinary, student-centred, learning outcome-based, inquiry-oriented, action-driven, and related to the students’ life and society.
  3. Innovative pedagogy and assessment methods are strongly encouraged to enable interactive learning to take place. Information technology and web-based resources could be explored to supplement/integrate with traditional face-to-face learning.
  4. Teaching general education is about determining the minimum common knowledge that all UM undergraduate students will possess after graduation and the enduring understandings that they will take away from the courses. Teachers should address the questions of “If this is the only course that the students are ever going to take in this area, what should they learn? And how will they gain enduring understandings and the ability to appreciate and value knowledge in this discipline area?”
  5. GE courses should encourage students to learn. They should expose our students to a way of thinking, and encourage them to be able to transfer skills, knowledge and values from one domain of knowledge to another.
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